Saudi Arabia and Iran: Outside Pressures

  • Rosemarie Said Zahlan

Abstract

During the first decade after World War I, while Britain adjusted its perception of its interests on the Trucial Coast, the pressures being created by its policy in the area were far from obvious. It was not until the air-route to India was actually being established and oil concessions were being obtained that a major clash over it occurred. Prior to that, there occasionally were minor collisions between the British authorities and the local rulers, but these usually concerned local matters and were of little significance in imperial terms. Added to this, the area’s internal affairs were still not regarded very seriously by policy-makers in London and Delhi.

Keywords

Sugar Assure Expense Hunt Settling 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    See Fu’ad Hamzah, Al-Bilad al-Arabiyyah al Saudiyyah (Mecca, 1937, and Riyadh, 1968);Google Scholar
  2. 1.
    Kelly, Britain and the Persian Gulf, 1795–1880; H. St J. B. Philby, Saudi Arabia (London, 1955);Google Scholar
  3. 1.
    Ameen Rihani, Tarikh Najd wa Mulhagatihi new edition (Beirut, 1972);Google Scholar
  4. 1.
    Hafiz Wahbah, Jazirat al-‘Arab fi’l-Qarn al Ishrin (Cairo, 1967).Google Scholar
  5. 2.
    See A. Cunningham, ‘The Wrong Horse: A Study of Anglo-Turkish Relations before the First World War’, (St Antony’s Papers, no. 17), Middle Eastern Affairs, no. 4 (1965).Google Scholar
  6. 16.
    R. M. Burrell, ‘Britain, Iran and the Persian Gulf: Some Aspects of the Situation in the 1920S and 1930s’, in The Arabian Peninsula: Society and Politics, ed. Derek Hopwood (London, 1972).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Rosemarie Said Zahlan 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosemarie Said Zahlan

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations