Pathogens of Chenopodiaceous Crops

  • G. R. Dixon

Abstract

This chapter highlights the benefits which have come for horticultural crops through the study of a more extensively grown agricultural crop, sugar beet. Many of the pathogens of chenopodiaceous crops are similar, and the close botanical relationship between sugar beet and red beet and spinach enables research from one crop to be easily applied to the others. This is especially the case for pathogens such as Peronospora farinosa (downy mildew), Erysiphe betae (powdery mildew) and virus pathogens such as Beet Yellows Virus. The sugar beet breeders have successfully avoided use of monogenic resistance to P. farinosa; unfortunately horticultural plant breeders have failed to follow their example, with predictable results. Development of fungal races with resistance to systemic fungicides first became evident on a wide scale with the beet pathogen Cercospora beticola and has given rise to interesting studies in Greece and the USA. Studies of the bacterial gall-forming pathogen. Agrobacterium tumefasciens are of fundamental significance to our understanding of the manner in which plant, and perhaps animal, tumours are initiated.

Keywords

Starch Germinate Nitrite Turkey Fructose 

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Copyright information

© G. R. Dixon 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Head of Horticulture DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenUK

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