Pathogens of Cucurbit Crops

  • G. R. Dixon

Abstract

The final two chapters in this book deal with cucurbit and solanaceous crops which are produced as field vegetables and under protected culture. Cucurbit crops cover a wide range of uses from tropical water melons (Citrullis vulgaris) to temperate glasshouse cucumbers (C. sativus). They are of considerable importance to the agricultural economies of both underdeveloped and developed countries. There are also industrial uses for the production of pickled or preserved cucumber, gherkins and chutneys. Control of pathogens of these crops has been achieved by breeding for resistance; utilizing polygenic systems to combat the bacterium Pseudomonas lachrymans (angular leaf spot), the fungus Pseudoperonospora cubensis (downy mildew) and major gene resistance to Sphaerotheca fuliginea (powdery mildew) and Didymella bryoniae (black rot). Resistance has been reinforced by use of systemic fungicidal control especially with S. fuliginea (powdery mildew) and Colletotrichum lagenarium (anthracnose). By virtue of the economic significance of cucurbit crops considerable studies of host-parasite physiology have been stimulated. This also results from the suitability of cucurbit seedlings for culture under controlled conditions and of their foliar pathogens for application at controlled levels of inoculum. Such combinations of host and parasite present the experimenter with a controllable system with which to work.

Keywords

Pseudomonas Cellulase Lactose Galactose Pectin 

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Copyright information

© G. R. Dixon 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Head of Horticulture DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenUK

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