Nadine Gordimer and the Pitfalls of Liberalism

  • Kenneth Parker

Abstract

In a lecture delivered at a National Union of South African Students Winter School, Nadine Gordimer noted that:

Conflict, they say, has kicked us into print. Well, I cannot deny that … Conflict can provide a deep and powerful stimulus, but a culture as a whole cannot be made out of the groans and sparks that fly. And it is out of a culture, from which man’s inner being is enriched as the substance in an integrated community grows fuller, that a literature draws its real substance in the long run. The thirst that comes from the salt of conflict will need some quenching.1

Keywords

Europe Beach Defend Alan Shoe 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    ‘The English Novel in South Africa’, from The Novel and the Nation, National Union of South African Students (Cape Town, 1960) p. 16.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ibid., p. 17.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    ‘A Writer in South Africa’, The London Magazine, vol. 5, no. 2 (May 1965) pp. 22–3.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Her contribution to the debate continues. See, for instance, ‘English-language Literature and Politics in South Africa’ in Aspects of South African Literature, ed. Christopher Heywood (London: Heinemann, 1976).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    ‘Towards a Desk-Drawer Literature’, The Classic, vol. 2, no. 4 (1968) pp. 73–4.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Nadine Gordimer, A World of Strangers (London: Gollancz, 1958).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Nadine Gordimer, Occasion for Loving (London: Gollancz, 1963).Google Scholar
  8. 9.
    Nadine Gordimer, The Late Bourgeois World (London: Gollancz, 1966).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kenneth Parker 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth Parker

There are no affiliations available

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