China Issues after Twenty Years: 1971

  • Wolf Mendl

Abstract

The three cyclical periods in Sino-Japanese relations after 1952 have a certain similarity at first sight. Each began at a time when relations between mainland China and Japan were minimal and the Chinese Communists were expressing hostility towards the government in Tokyo. As the years passed, contacts picked up again and developed new forms. Things then moved to a fresh climax in which the various channels of communication were all but blocked for a relatively short period.

Keywords

Europe Defend Stake Indonesia Kato 

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Notes

  1. 4.
    See Etō S., ‘An Outline of Formosan History’, in M. Mancall, ed., Formosa Today ( New York, Praeger, 1964 ), pp. 43–58.Google Scholar
  2. Also, Lung-chu Chen and Harold Lasswell, Formosa, China, and the United Nations: Formosa in the World Community ( New York, St. Martin’s Press, 1967 ), pp. 194–6;Google Scholar
  3. Sheldon L. Appleton, ‘Taiwan: Portents of Change’, Asian Survey, vol. XI, no. 1, Jan 1971, pp. 69–70.Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    John E. Endicott, Japan’s Nuclear Option: Political, Technical, and Strategic Factors (New York, Praeger, 1975), pp. 55–8, 97, 101, 11112, n. 251.Google Scholar
  5. 7.
    Frank Langdon, Japan’s Foreign Policy ( Vancouver, Univ. of British Columbia Press, 1973 ), pp. 188–9.Google Scholar
  6. 10.
    See also, Tanaka Yasumasa, ‘The Change and Continuity in Contemporary Japanese Society as Shown in Opinion Polls between 1946 and 1972’, Gakushuin Review of Law and Politics, no. 8, 1972.Google Scholar
  7. 11.
    Irie Michimasa, ‘Communist China’s Nuclear Power and the Security of Japan’, Journal of Social and Political Ideas in Japan, vol. III, no. 2, Aug 1965, pp. 19–21;Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Royal Institute of International Affairs 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolf Mendl

There are no affiliations available

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