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Flowmeters pp 68-87 | Cite as

Other Volumetric Flowmeters

  • Alan T. J. Hayward
Chapter

Abstract

The electromagnetic flowmeter utilises the same basic principle as the electrical generator: when a conductor moves across a magnetic field a voltage is induced in the conductor, and the magnitude of the voltage is directly proportional to the speed of the moving conductor. If the conductor is a section of conductive liquid flowing in a non-conductive pipe through a magnetic field, and electrodes are mounted in the pipe wall at the positions shown in Figure 6.1, the voltage induced across the electrodes should be proportional to flowrate.

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© Alan T. J. Hayward 1979

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  • Alan T. J. Hayward

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