The British Constitution for British Colonies: Canada, 1759–1831

  • John Manning Ward
Part of the Cambridge Commonwealth Series book series

Abstract

While the Thirteen Colonies moved towards independence, Britain began to govern the vast territories acquired from France in North America in 1763. To begin with, the old representative system that had been customary in the Thirteen Colonies and the West Indies was chosen for Quebec (as the new possessions were called), but this was abandoned — first in favour of two illiberal forms of government (one unconstitutional), and then, in 1791, in favour of the earliest attempt to grant to British colonies institutions deliberately fashioned on those of the mother country. But the liberal innovation of 1791 was founded on what turned out to be mistaken assumptions about society and politics, and about the possibility of anglicisation, in British North America. As a result the policy was never fully implemented, although enough of it survived to make its long-term fruits decisive in the political history of Canada.

Keywords

Sugar Burner Europe Shipping Assimilation 

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Copyright information

© John Manning Ward 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Manning Ward
    • 1
  1. 1.University of SydneyAustralia

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