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Nickel

  • David Nicholls
Chapter
Part of the A Macmillan Chemistry Text book series

Abstract

Nickel derives its name from the ore kupfernickel which was at one time believed to be an ore of copper. While nickel is not an uncommon element in the earth’s crust, there are relatively few known deposits of nickel ores that are capable of being worked economically. One such deposit is that of pentlandite (Ni, Fe)9 S8 at Sudbury, Ontario. The metal is extracted either electrolytically or by the Mond carbonyl process (section 10.2.2).

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Copyright information

© D. Nicholls 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Nicholls
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Inorganic, Physical and Industrial ChemistryUniversity of LiverpoolUK

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