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Cobalt

  • David Nicholls
Chapter
Part of the A Macmillan Chemistry Text book series

Abstract

Cobalt compounds have been used in coloured glass for at least 4000 years but the metal has been produced industrially only during this century. It is a widely distributed but relatively uncommon element in the earth’s crust. It occurs biologically in vitamin B12, which contains Co3+ bonded octahedrally to five nitrogen atoms (four from pyrroline rings and one from a benzimidazole ring) and the carbon atom of a CN group. The industrial extraction of the metal is usually an ancillary process to the extraction of other metals such as copper and lead.

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Copyright information

© D. Nicholls 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Nicholls
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Inorganic, Physical and Industrial ChemistryUniversity of LiverpoolUK

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