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Vanadium

  • David Nicholls
Chapter
Part of the A Macmillan Chemistry Text book series

Abstract

Unlike titanium, vanadium shows a wide range of oxidation states (+5 to +2) in aqueous solution, as well as the low oxidation states of +1, 0, and −1. As a result of this, vanadium is perhaps the most colourful of the transition elements, showing compounds of every colour and even with considerable colour variation within each oxidation state. It was because of the beauty of these colours that Sefstrom in 1830 named the element vanadium in honour of the Scandinavian goddess Vanadis.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© D. Nicholls 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Nicholls
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Inorganic, Physical and Industrial ChemistryUniversity of LiverpoolUK

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