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A Survey Of International Comparisons Of Productivity

  • I. B. Kravis

Abstract

Productivity is the ratio of output to one input such as labour services or to inputs taken in their totality. Since economics is in its very essence concerned with the organisation of inputs (scarce means) to produce outputs (satisfy human wants), comparisons of productivity go to the heart of the assessment of economic performance. By far the most common form of comparisons is over time in a given country.1 We are concerned here, however, with the less frequently made comparisons between countries.

Keywords

Labour Productivity Total Factor Productivity International Comparison Price Comparison Individual Industry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Royal Economic Society and the Social Science Research Council 1977

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  • I. B. Kravis

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