Silicon based Materials

  • D. J. Hunter
Part of the Macmillan Engineering Evaluations book series (MECS)

Abstract

In 1948, transistor action in germanium was discovered at the Bell System Laboratories by a team headed by Shockley, Bardeen and Brattain. This exceptional feat of observation has so revolutionised the electronics industry that today, more than twenty years after the event, the volume of research and development into semiconductor devices is greater than in any other field of electrical engineering and is still increasing. The transistor is a household name and in the case of the small portable radio, which it made possible, has come to be referred to the appliance rather than the device. In addition a wide range of other devices have been invented and exploited from microwave devices whose size is less than a match head, to large power silicon rectifiers capable of handling 1 000 A at voltages as high as 10 kV.

Keywords

Nickel Phosphorus Microwave Carbide Recombination 

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Hunter
    • 1
  1. 1.Westinghouse Brake and Signal Company LimitedUK

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