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Regional Economics: A Survey

  • John R. Meyer

Abstract

The creation of a new area of specialization is always a matter of interest in any academic field and the phenomenal rise of what has come to be known as “ regional analysis ” in economics is no exception.

Keywords

Regional Economic Regional Analysis Location Theory Urban Economic Economic Base 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Royal Economic Society and the American Economic Association 1965

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  • John R. Meyer

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