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Interallied Cooperation

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

The long duration of the war with its ever-rising requirements of supply drove the Allied Powers to coordinate their economic activities in many spheres. The toll of merchant shipping taken by the German submarines, for example, produced shortages necessitating cooperation in the allocation of shipping tonnage. Similarly, cooperation in foreign purchasing helped to assure that the requirements of all were reasonably well met and that competitive bidding for scarce products did not needlessly drive up prices. One example of interallied cooperation is provided by the activities of the Wheat Executive, created in November, 1916. The text of the agreement establishing the Wheat Executive is given below.

Keywords

British Government Competitive Bidding Probable Balance Merchant Shipping Foreign Purchasing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. Etienne Clémentel, La France et la politique économique interalliée (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1931), pp. 330–333, with deletions. Translated by the editors. Used by permission of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie

There are no affiliations available

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