The Last Act

  • René Albrecht-Carrié
Part of the Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

The Crowe memorandum, assuming that the analysis it gave represented the views of the British government, made it clear that if the drift of things continued on an unaltered course the days of peace and of the Concert were numbered. Indeed they were, and this last chapter will concern itself briefly with three significant episodes. Two of them, the Bosnian annexation crisis of 1908–1909 and the Balkan Wars of 1912–1913, are instances of the collective agreement of Europe in resolving its differences in peace; yet they were also failures, for agreement was only purchased at the price of creating further dissatisfaction and resentment. The third, the July crisis of 1914, was the most unqualified failure of all.

Keywords

Europe Assure Turkey Expense Tate 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    Momtchilo Nintchitch, La Crise bosniaque (1908–1909) et les puissances européennes (2 vols., Paris, 1937)Google Scholar
  2. Bernadotte E. Schmitt, The Annexation of Bosnia (Cambridge, Mass., 1937).Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    Luigi Albertini, The Origins of the War of 1914 (Oxford, 1953–1957), vol. I, p. 221.Google Scholar
  4. 9.
    J. Lepsius, A. Mendelssohn Bartholdy and H. Thimme (eds.), Die grosse Politik der europäischen Kabinette, 1871–1914 (40 vols., Berlin, 1922–1927), vol. XXVI, Doc. 9460.Google Scholar
  5. 11.
    E. C. Helmreich, The Diplomacy of the Balkan Wars 1912–1913 (Cambridge, Mass., 1938).Google Scholar
  6. 18.
    Augustus Oakes, and Robert B. Mowat, Great European Treaties of the Nineteenth Century (Oxford, 1918), pp. 361–62Google Scholar

Copyright information

© René Albrecht-Carrié 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • René Albrecht-Carrié

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations