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From Ottawa to Kandahar and Back: The Securitization of Canadian Foreign Aid

  • Stephen Brown
Part of the Rethinking International Development Series book series (RID)

Abstract

Since the mid-2000s, national and international security has played an increasingly important role in Canadian foreign aid, as it did in other donor countries examined in this volume. The increased focus on security-related issues privileged certain aid recipients and modified how the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the main purveyor of Canada’s official development assistance (ODA), operated in relation to other Canadian government bodies in those countries.1 Nowhere was this more evident than in the Canadian government’s involvement in Afghanistan, but the trend has declined since Canada scaled back its involvement there.

Keywords

Foreign Affair Development Assistance Canadian Government Policy Coherence Fragile State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Stephen Brown 2016

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  • Stephen Brown

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