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A Place Called Johnny Rotten Square: The Ljubljana Punk Scene and the Subversion of Socialist Yugoslavia

  • Oskar Mulej
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of Social Movements book series (PSHSM)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the punk and new wave scene of early 1980s Yugoslavia, with special attention devoted to the significance of punk in the Slovenian capital, Ljubljana. The phenomenon of Ljubljana punk rock was very important for the development of alternative music scenes all across Yugoslavia, as well as also being of major significance to the social and political changes that unfolded in Slovenia during that decade. Arriving initially as a ‘Western’ product of pop culture and fashion, and containing a strong impulse of youth revolt, it found unlikely (but fertile) ground among the young generation of the early eighties in the capital city of this small socialist republic, where it transformed into a largely home-grown and diverse subcultural scene.

Keywords

Eastern Bloc Rock Music Local Scene Civic Movement Socialist Everyday Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Oskar Mulej 2016

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  • Oskar Mulej

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