Income Inequality in Italy: Tendencies and Policy Implications

  • Maurizio Franzini
  • Michele Raitano

Abstract

Recently, the economic literature has been increasingly concerned with the inequality in income and in the standard of living both for individuals and households.1 Empirical evidence has proved that in most countries, during the last two or three decades, incomes have become more dispersed and also more and more concentrated in the hands of small and privileged segments of the society (the top 1 percent or 0.1 percent; Atkinson et al., 2011). The pace at which such developments have taken place has not been the same in all countries but, because of such developments, inequality is very high in several countries. Italy is one of them.

Keywords

Migration Europe Income Expense OECD 

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Copyright information

© Maurizio Franzini and Michele Raitano 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maurizio Franzini
  • Michele Raitano

There are no affiliations available

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