Ministry of the Cathedral Prayer Board: Studying Ordinary Prayer

  • Tania ap Siôn
Chapter

Summary

Although church congregations in England and Wales continue to decline, churches and cathedrals are reaching out in new ways to respond to the spiritual quest of those who choose to visit these ancient buildings. In this environment the prayer board at Bangor Cathedral has attracted increasing interest in recent years. This study presents an analysis of one thousand prayer requests posted on this prayer board, drawing on two fields of theory. The first field of theory concerns ordinary theology as defined by Jeff Astley. The second field of theory concerns an analytic framework for identifying the constituent components of ordinary prayer, distinguishing between prayer intention, prayer reference, and prayer objective.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. ap Siôn, T. (2007). Listening to prayers: An analysis of prayers left in a country church in rural England. Archiv für Religionspsychologie, 29, 199–226.Google Scholar
  2. ap Siôn, T. (2008). Distinguishing between intention, reference, and objective in an analysis of prayer requests for health and wellbeing: Eavesdropping from the rural vestry. Mental Health, Religion and Culture, 11, 53–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. ap Siôn, T. (2009). Ordinary prayer and the rural church: An empirical study of prayer cards. Rural Theology, 7, 17–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. ap Siôn, T. (2010). Implicit religion and ordinary prayer. Implicit Religion, 13, 275–294.Google Scholar
  5. ap Siôn, T. (2011). Interpreting God’s activity in the public square: Accessing the ordinary theology of personal prayer. In L. J. Francis & H.-G. Ziebertz (Eds.), The public significance of religion (pp. 315–342). Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. ap Siôn, T. (2013). Ordinary prayer and the activity of God: Reading a cathedral prayer board. In J. Astley & L. J. Francis (Eds.), Studies in ordinary theology (pp. 147–157). Farnham, United Kingdom: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  7. ap Siôn, T. (2015). Prayer requests in an English cathedral, and a new Analytic Framework for Intercessory Prayer. In G. Giordan & L. Woodhead (Eds.), A sociology of prayer (pp. 169–190). Farnham, United Kingdom: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  8. ap Siôn, T., & Edwards, O. (2012). Praying ‘online’: The ordinary theology of prayer intentions posted on the Internet. Journal of Beliefs and Values, 33, 95–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. ap Siôn, T., & Edwards, O. (2013). Say one for me: The implicit religion of prayers from the street. Mental Health, Religion and Culture, 16, 922–935.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. ap Siôn, T., & Nash, P. (2013). Coping through prayer: An empirical study in implicit religion concerning prayers for children in hospital. Mental Health, Religion and Culture, 16, 936–952.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Astley, J. (2002). Ordinary theology: Looking, listening and learning theology. Farnham, United Kingdom: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  12. Astley, J. (2013). The analysis, investigation and application of ordinary theology. In J. Astley & L. J. Francis (Eds.), Studies in ordinary theology (pp. 1–9). Farnham, United Kingdom: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  13. Astley, J., & Francis, L. J. (Eds.). (2013). Exploring ordinary theology. Farnham, United Kingdom: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  14. Brown, A., & Burton, L. (2007). Learning from prayer requests in a rural church: An exercise in ordinary theology. Rural Theology, 5, 45–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Burton, L. (2009). The dear departed: Prayers for the dead on a prayer tree in an English parish church. Rural Theology, 7, 83–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Burton, L. (2010). Prayers on a prayer tree: Ordinary theology from a tourist village. Rural Theology, 8, 62–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Cadge, W., & Daglian, M. (2008). Blessings, strength, and guidance: Prayer frames in a hospital prayer book. Poetics, 36, 358–373.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Christie, A. (2007). Who do you say I am? Answers from the pews. Journal of Adult Theological Education, 4, 181–194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Christie, A., & Astley, J. (2009). Ordinary soteriology: A qualitiative study. In L. J. Francis, M. Robbins, & J. Astley (Eds.), Empirical theology in texts and tables: Qualitative, quantitative and comparative perspectives (pp. 177–196). Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Grossoehme, D. H. (1996). Prayer reveals belief: Images of God from hospital prayers. Journal of Pastoral Care, 50, 33–39.Google Scholar
  21. Grossoehme, D. H., Jacobson, J., Cotton, S., Ragsdale, J. R., VanDyke, R., & Seid, M. (2011). Written prayers and religious coping in a paediatric hospital setting. Mental Health, Religion and Culture, 14, 423–432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Grossoehme, D. H., VanDyke, R., Jacobson, J., Cotton, S., Ragsdale, J. R., & Seid, M. (2010). Written prayers in a pediatric hospital: Linguistic analysis. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 2, 227–233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Hancocks, G., & Lardner, M. (2007). I say a little prayer for you: What do hospital prayers reveal about people’s perceptions of God? Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy, 8, 29–42.Google Scholar
  24. Lee, D. B. (2009). Maria of the Oak: Society and the problem of divine intervention. Sociology of Religion, 70, 213–231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Office for National Statistics (2013). Neighbourhood statistics from census 2001 and 2011 data. Retrieved from http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk for census 2001 and 2011 data.
  26. Schmied, G. (2002). God images in prayer intention books. Implicit Religion, 5, 121–126.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Leslie J. Francis 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tania ap Siôn

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations