Motivational Styles of Cathedral Congregations

  • Leslie J. Francis
  • Emyr Williams
Chapter

Summary

This chapter draws on theory concerned with religious orientations generated within the psychology of religion to illuminate the different motivational styles of three different cathedral congregations. Religious orientation theory distinguishes among three motivational styles described as intrinsic orientation, extrinsic orientation, and quest orientation. These motivational styles were explored by inviting the worshippers attending the main Sunday morning services at three cathedrals to complete a questionnaire survey. Two main conclusions emerge from these data. First, the motivational style most frequently endorsed by the worshippers was that of intrinsic religiosity. Quest religiosity came in second place, followed by extrinsic religiosity. Second, there were statistically significant differences in motivational styles between the three cathedrals.

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Copyright information

© Leslie J. Francis 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leslie J. Francis
  • Emyr Williams

There are no affiliations available

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