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Cathedral Engagement with Young People

  • Owen Edwards
  • Tania ap Siôn
Chapter

Summary

The Archbishops’ Commission on Cathedrals (1994) identified education as among the crucial purposes of cathedrals. This chapter analyzes the websites of 15 cathedrals within the most urban dioceses of the Church of England and the Church in Wales in order to ascertain the variety of ways in which cathedrals are advancing the educational work of the church in urban areas. The analysis distinguishes between four primary areas of activity, characterized as concerning school-related education, faith-related education, visitor-related education, and music-related education. Each of these four areas is illustrated by a case study profiling current practice.

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Copyright information

© Leslie J. Francis 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Owen Edwards
  • Tania ap Siôn

There are no affiliations available

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