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Shaping Cathedral Studies: A Scientific Approach

  • Leslie J. Francis
  • Judith A. Muskett
Chapter

Summary

This chapter sets the context for the book by introducing the field of Cathedral Studies and by discussing the scientific approach illustrated in the following ten chapters. The argument is developed in four steps. The first step discusses the complementary perspectives afforded by the scientific study of religion (including the sociology of religion and the psychology of religion) and empirical theology. The second step examines the evidence for the assertion that the Anglican cathedrals of England offer key points of growth for the Church. The third step traces the development of Cathedral Studies from the landmark report published by the Archbishops’ Commission on Cathedrals in 1994, Heritage and Renewal. The fourth step provides an introduction to each of the ten scientific studies published for the first time in this book.

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© Leslie J. Francis 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leslie J. Francis
  • Judith A. Muskett

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