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The Stockholm 1912 Olympics

  • Luke J. Harris

Abstract

The 1912 Olympics continued the growth of the Games after the success of the London Games. In total, the fifth Olympiad witnessed 28 nations competing, across 102 events in 15 sports. Among these nations were seven making their Olympic debuts (Chile, Egypt, Iceland, Japan, Luxembourg, Portugal and Serbia), bringing the total number of athletes competing up to a new record of 2,380.1 Fifty-seven of these athletes were women, primarily in Stockholm to compete in the swimming and diving events that were allowing women to partake for the first time. These Games have been dubbed ‘the arrival of the Olympic Games as the world’s premier international event,’2 such was their success.

Keywords

Field Event Olympic Game Gold Medal International Olympic Committee Ideal Style 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Luke J. Harris 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luke J. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.Canterbury Christ Church UniversityUK

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