Introduction

  • Tomasz Kamusella
  • Motoki Nomachi
  • Catherine Gibson

Abstract

The Handbook is a fruit of labour by many hands. The authors, in one way or another, agree with the editors that a quarter of a century after the fall of communism and the breakups of the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia, it is high time to re-evaluate the imprint these processes have left on the linguistic landscape and on the interface between the linguistic and the political. The relevance of such an interdisciplinary reflection cannot be emphasized more than by bringing to the reader’s attention that the break-up of Yugoslavia was followed by the parallel split of the Serbo-Croatian language. In this manner, each post-Yugoslav state (with the sole exception of Kosovo) was fitted with its own specific national language, ideally, not shared with any other state or nation.

Keywords

Migration Europe Sorb Timothy Baltic Language 

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References

  1. Anderson, Benedict. 1983. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso.Google Scholar
  2. Dulichenko, Aleksandr D. 1981. Slavianskie literaturnye mikroiazyki [Slavic Literary Microlanguages {in Russian} {in Russian Cyrillic}]. Tallin: Valgus.Google Scholar
  3. Snyder, Timothy. 2010. Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. London: Bodley Head, an imprint of Random House.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Tomasz Kamusella, Motoki Nomachi, and Catherine Gibson 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomasz Kamusella
  • Motoki Nomachi
  • Catherine Gibson

There are no affiliations available

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