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Conclusion

  • Per Högselius
  • Arne Kaijser
  • Erik van der Vleuten
Part of the Making Europe: Technology and Transformations, 1850–2000 book series (MAKE)

Abstract

Michel Chevalier had a dream about the future of Europe: railroads, steam shipping lines and other infrastructure, in combination with the abolition of tariffs, would give rise to a “circulation society,” in which Europeans cooperated closely and enjoyed huge economic benefits. Poverty would vanish and natural obstacles would cease to hinder trade and other activities. Moreover, war would become almost impossible among peoples and countries closely cooperating in all spheres of life. When Chevalier died in 1879, he had seen much of his dream come true: railroads crisscrossed the European continent, steam ships provided fast and regular transport across the oceans, and telegraph cables connected cities around the globe, enabling almost instant communications. Large volumes of goods were indeed traded across borders and over long distances, thanks to new infrastructure and free trade agreements.

Keywords

Free Trade Agreement Ecological Network Iron Curtain Interwar Period Infrastructure Building 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Per Högselius, Arne Kaijser, Erik van der Vleuten and Foundation for the History of Technology 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Högselius
  • Arne Kaijser
  • Erik van der Vleuten

There are no affiliations available

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