‘Don’t Believe in Foreigners:’ The Female Franchise Factor and the Munich By-elections

  • Julie V. Gottlieb

Abstract

Quick on the heels of the Munich Agreement there was speculation that a gene ral election would be called to capitalize on Chamberlain’s vast popularity with women voters. It was believed that Chamberlain was “being pressed by some of his advisers and some of his newspapers to have a snatch election, in which he is to be paraded before the electorate, particularly the women voters, as the man who saved us from war.”1 In the absence of a general election, the post-Munich by-elections were the most reliable gauges of the Prime Minister’s wavering popularity with the electorate as a whole and with women in particular, and the public unease about the power of women as an electoral force.

Keywords

Burning Corn Manifold Europe Coherence 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Julie V. Gottlieb 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie V. Gottlieb
    • 1
  1. 1.University of SheffieldUK

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