A New Perspective on Product Engineering Overcoming Sequential Process Models

  • A. Albers
  • E. Sadowski
  • L. Marxen
Chapter

Abstract

In recent decades, the role of human individuals in product engineering was neglected as more and more effort was put into developing computer tools. A major factor in design that will never change is humans being at the centre of product engineering. Recent approaches of modelling product engineering processes as a sequence of activities neglect the complex interrelationships of activities carried out by parties participating in the process, as well as internal and external factors that influence the system of objectives, the operation system and the system of objects. A framework is presented here that aims to overcome the difficulties in current process models. Management and engineering perspectives of a product engineering process are different but equally important. Sequential approaches do not successfully satisfy both. Product engineering can be described as the transformation of objectives into objects. To do this, the C&C2-Approach is needed as it permits the description of form and function simultaneously. The importance of validation in product engineering is described and the result of these investigations presented: The Integrated Product Engineering Model (iPeM). The iPeM has undergone initial testing in engineering projects and appears to be a promising approach to a mental framework for the future of engineering design.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Albers
    • 1
  • E. Sadowski
    • 1
  • L. Marxen
    • 1
  1. 1.Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)KarlsruheGermany

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