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High School Computer Science Teacher Preparation Programs

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Abstract

This chapter puts the MTCS course in the wider context of computer science teacher preparation programs. It first describes a model for high school computer science education model or high school computer science education that one of its components is computer science teacher preparation programs. The model consists of five key elements – a well-defined curriculum, a requirement of a mandatory formal computer science teaching license, teacher preparation programs, national center for computer science teachers, and research in computer science education – as well as interconnections between these elements. Then, the focus is placed on the teacher preparation programs component of the model, describing a workshop targeted at computer scientists and computer science curriculum developers who wish to launch computer science teacher preparation programs at their universities but lack knowledge about the actual construction of such programs.

Keywords

  • Computer Science
  • Text Book
  • Bachelor Degree
  • Teacher Preparation Program
  • Teaching Guide

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-0-85729-443-2_15
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Fig. 15.1

Notes

  1. 1.

     In fact, a Masters degree is required for teaching any subject in the Israeli high school system. It is, however, difficult to meet these requirements and in most cases high school teachers only have a Bachelors degree. Unfortunately, and as it happens in other countries, some teachers, mainly those who joined the system many years ago, do not have even a Bachelors degree in computer science. They usually have a Bachelors degree in another scientific subject and switched to teaching of computer science for different, administrative as well as personal, reasons.

  2. 2.

     Based on Israeli National Center for Computer Science Teachers (2002). © 2002 ACM, Inc. Included here by permission.

  3. 3.

     Seehttp://cse.proj.ac.il

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Correspondence to Orit Hazzan .

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Hazzan, O., Lapidot, T., Ragonis, N. (2011). High School Computer Science Teacher Preparation Programs. In: Guide to Teaching Computer Science. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-85729-443-2_15

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-85729-443-2_15

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