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Choosing, and Being, a Good Mentor

  • Julie Ann Sosa
Chapter

Abstract

Mentoring is considered to be an essential duty of academic surgeons. It is a catalyst for success in academic medicine, as mentoring relationships can facilitate career selection, advancement, and productivity among mentees. Unfortunately, there are important barriers to successful mentoring, such as increased clinical, research, administrative, and teaching demands on academic surgeons, along with the perception that mentorship is undervalued (or not recognized or rewarded) by many academic institutions. Is mentorship an art that is in jeopardy of extinction?

Keywords

Mentorship Mentoring Mentor Career development Role-modeling 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author would like to thank Drs. Herbert Chen, Charles Scoggins, and Jennifer Tseng, all of whom provided their lecture materials from the AAS Fall Courses for the creation of this manuscript.

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Selected Readings

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    Jackson VA, Palepu A, Szalacha L, Caswell C, Carr PL, Inui T. “Having the right chemistry:” a qualitative study of mentoring in academic medicine. Acad Med. 2003;78:328-334.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  3.  .
    Palepu A, Friedman R, Barnett R, et al. Junior faculty members’ mentoring relationships and their professional development in U.S. medical schools. Acad Med. 1998;73:318-322.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Pololi L, Knight S. Mentoring faculty in academic medicine: a new paradigm? JGIM. 2005;20(9):866-870.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie Ann Sosa
    • 1
  1. 1.Divisions of Endocrine Surgery and Surgical Oncology, Department of SurgeryYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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