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Part of the book series: Progress in Mathematics ((MBC,volume 8))

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Abstract

Propositional logic explores simple grammatical connections, like and, or and not, between the simplest “atomic sentences”. Such atomic sentences are for example: A = “Paris is the capital of France” B = “mice chase elephants” Such atomic components (of possibly more complex sentences) can be either true or false. (In our understanding of the world, A is true but B is false.) The subject of propositional logic is to declare formally how such “truth values” of the atomic components extend to a truth value of a more complex structure, such as A and B. (For the above example, we know that A and B is false because B is already false.)

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© 2008 Birkhäuser Boston

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(2008). Propositional Logic. In: Logic for Computer Scientists. Progress in Mathematics, vol 8. Birkhäuser Boston. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-8176-4763-6_2

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