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Part of the book series: Linguistica Computazionale ((LICO,volume 9))

Abstract

The present paper addresses a number of issues related to achieving ‘representativeness’ in linguistic corpus design, including: discussion of what it means to `represent’ a language, definition of the target population, stratified versus proportional sampling of a language, sampling within texts, and issues relating to the required sample size (number of texts) of a corpus. The paper distinguishes among various ways that linguistic features can be distributed within and across texts; it analyzes the distributions of several particular features, and it discusses the implications of these distributions for corpus design.

The paper argues that theoretical research should be prior in corpus design, to identify the situational parameters that distinguish among texts in a speech community, and to identify the types of linguistic features that will be analyzed in the corpus. These theoretical considerations should be complemented by empirical investigations of linguistic variation in a pilot corpus of texts, as a basis for specific sampling decisions. The actual construction of a corpus would then proceed in cycles: the original design based on theoretical and pilot-study analyses, followed by collection of texts, followed by further empirical investigations of linguistic variation and revision of the design.

I would like to thank Edward Finegan for his many helpful comments on an earlier draft of this paper. A modified version of this paper was distributed for the Pisa Workshop on Textual Corpora, held at the University of Pisa (January 1992), and discussions with several of the workshop participants were also helpful in revising the paper.

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Antonio Zampolli Nicoletta Calzolari Martha Palmer

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© 1994 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

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Biber, D. (1994). Representativeness in Corpus Design. In: Zampolli, A., Calzolari, N., Palmer, M. (eds) Current Issues in Computational Linguistics: In Honour of Don Walker. Linguistica Computazionale, vol 9. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-585-35958-8_20

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-585-35958-8_20

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

  • Print ISBN: 978-0-7923-2998-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-0-585-35958-8

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