Industry-Based Learning

  • Kathy Henschke
  • Patrick Poppins
Conference paper
Part of the IFIP – The International Federation for Information Processing book series (IFIPAICT, volume 292)

Abstract

Research from the fields of adult learning, workplace education, professional development, organisational learning and co-operative education are drawn on to identify elements that should be considered in the design, implementation, management and sustained improvement of co-op programs. Each work placement is unique meld of stakeholders, the job and the organisational context. Key factors that promote learning in the workplace include the engagement of the work place supervisor in the student’s professional development; the learning environment within the organisation; and the student’s own motivation, abilities and learning orientation: It is proposed that information systems delivering co-op programs need to manage: (a) the development and performance of industry partnerships, (b) the relationships between key stakeholders; and (c) the professional skills development and learning.

Keywords

Information management systems Co-operative education ICT professionals employability skills workplace learning professional development 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathy Henschke
    • 1
  • Patrick Poppins
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Business Information TechnologyRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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