Neuropsychological Assessment Approaches and Diagnostic Procedures

  • Margaret Semrud-Clikeman
  • Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is twofold. First, we will briefly review three generally accepted approaches to neuropsychological assessment. Second, we will present our transactional assessment approach. This discussion will include evaluation methods for selected functional areas of the central nervous system. The conceptual framework underlying each battery and research with each approach will also be presented.

Keywords

Neuropsychological Assessment Brain Damage Executive Function Wisconsin Card Sort Test Reticular Activate System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret Semrud-Clikeman
    • 1
  • Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison
    • 2
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityLansingUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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