Childhood Cancer

  • Margaret Semrud-Clikeman
  • Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison

Abstract

Childhood cancers, though relatively rare, are found in children at all ages. The two most common forms of childhood cancer are childhood leukemia and brain tumors. Although the etiologies for these disorders differ, treatment frequently involves chemotherapy and cranial irradiation. The chemotherapy regimen has not been found to have the same effects on later outcome that irradiation produces. It is these “late effects” that most concern the child neuropsychologist. Many more children are surviving given the improvement in treatment over the past few decades. Survival for brain tumors is approximately 70 percent (Brenner, 2003) and above 70 percent for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (Gatta, Capocaccia, Coleman, Ries, & Berrino, 2002).

Keywords

Brain Tumor Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Childhood Cancer Cranial Radiation Therapy Sluggish Cognitive Tempo 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret Semrud-Clikeman
    • 1
  • Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison
    • 2
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityLansingUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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