Modeling and Managing Uncertainty in Process Planning and Scheduling

Chapter
Part of the Springer Optimization and Its Applications book series (SOIA, volume 30)

Summary

Uncertainty appears in all the different levels of the industry from the detailed process description to multisite manufacturing. The successful utilization of process models relies heavily on the ability to handle system variability. Thus modeling and managing uncertainty in process planning and scheduling has received a lot of attention in the open literature in recent years from chemical engineering and operations research communities. The purpose of this chapter is to review the main methodologies that have been developed to address the problem of uncertainty in production planning and scheduling as well as to identify the main challenges in this area. The uncertainties in process operations are first analyzed, and the different mathematical approaches that exist to describe process uncertainties are classified. Based on the different descriptions for the uncertainties, alternative planning and scheduling approaches and relevant optimization models are reviewed and discussed. Further research challenges in the field of planning and scheduling under uncertainty are identified and some new ideas are discussed.

Keywords

Transportation Income Expense Hull Peri 

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Notes

The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from the National Science Foundation under Grants CTS 0625515 and 0224745.

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© Springer-Verlag US 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Chemical and Biochemical EngineeringRutgers UniversityPiscataway
  2. 2.Department of Chemical and Biochemical EngineeringRutgers UniversityPiscataway

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