The Gibbons pp 241-264 | Cite as

The Ecology and Evolution of Hylobatid Communities: Causal and Contextual Factors Underlying Inter- and Intraspecific Variation

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Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

References

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of OregonEugeneUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Notre DameNotre DameUSA

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