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A Child Study/Lesson Study: Developing Minds to Understand and Teach Children

  • Joan V. Mast
  • Herbert P. Ginsburg
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes how teacher engagement in a learning community designed to examine their own teaching and student learning can make significant contributions to improving mathematics education. Child Study/Lesson Study (CS/LS), a new form of professional development, combines significant components of Japanese Lesson Study with clinical interviews to create opportunities for teachers to engage in critical reflections on teaching and learning. Student responses during clinical interviews often challenge teacher assumptions of how students make sense of and learn from a given lesson. Furthermore, teachers benefit from clinical interview information on the nature of student concepts, thinking strategies, and misconceptions. A case study which includes teachers discussing children’s mathematical thinking is included to model how clinical interviews accelerate meaningful professional discourse during lesson study sessions.

Keywords

Assessment Clinical interview Elementary mathematics Fractions Lesson study Professional development 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Scotch-Plains Fanwood Public SchoolsScotch PlainsUSA

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