The Nebula Is Leaving the Solar System

  • William Sheehan
  • Christopher J. Conselice
Chapter

Abstract

Th e first of the great American observatories was Lick, on Mt. Hamilton, a 4200-ft . peak in the Coast Range near San Jose, whose 36-inch refractor was funded by the late eccentric California real estate speculator James Lick. It was there, as we have seen, that E. E. Barnard began the wide-angle photography of the Milky Way. It was no accident, by the way, that California would become not only the premier location for astronomy but also for the nascent motion picture industry: in both cases the sine qua non was the climate.

Keywords

Solar System Radial Velocity Absorption Line Spiral Nebula Planetary Nebula 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Sheehan
    • 1
  • Christopher J. Conselice
    • 2
  1. 1.WillmarUSA
  2. 2.School of Physics and Astronomy University of NottinghamNottinghamUK

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