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Dance

  • Lisa M. Schoene
Chapter

Abstract

Today the dancer’s body appears in many shapes and sizes, due to an increasing interest in dance forms other than ballet, i.e., tap, modern, jazz, hip hop, and Irish dance. Dance for many years has only been seen as an “art form,” now we must realize the rigors and athleticism that is necessary to perform. The differing styles of dance all place high demands on the body which parallels or supersedes that of any other demanding sport. “Only the astronaut in our society is a more selected individual than the professional ballet dancer,” according to Dr. William Hamilton [1].

Keywords

Dance injuries Dance shoes Lower extremity biomechanics 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa M. Schoene
    • 1
  1. 1.Gurnee Podiatry & Sports MedicinePark CityUSA

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