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Customization of Visual Lobe Measurement System for Testing the Effects of Foveal Load

  • Cathy H. Y. Chiu
  • Alan H. S. Chan
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 5)

Visual lobe is commonly defined as the area visible at a single glimpse or the area within which a point source can be perceived without movement of the eyes or the head. Lobe size is a function of the characteristics of the target and background; targets of different conspicuity give different visual lobe areas. Performance of a peripheral task was also affected when a central task was performed concurrently. In a dual-task study, deterioration of a peripheral task was usually noted when foveal load was induced. The task performance deterioration was due to the different experimental settings of the foveal load variables such as complexity of foveal load and priority assignment of attentional resources. However, various foveal load features were used in different experiments. Finally, the various features of foveal load for dual-task tests were summarized. The visual lobe measurement system (VILOMS) software was then enhanced in order to investigate the effects of foveal load on visual lobe shape [1].

Keywords

Foveal loading lobe shape index visual lobe measurement 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cathy H. Y. Chiu
    • 1
  • Alan H. S. Chan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Engineering ManagementCity University of Hong KongChina

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