Restorative Justice to Reduce Victimization

  • Heather Strang
  • Lawrence W. Sherman

What do we know about the effects of restorative justice (RJ) on victimization? The answer to that question depends on how we know what we think we know. This chapter answers a traditional question in crime prevention research with a non-traditional method, the systematic review. The aim of this chapter is to describe our conclusions about the effects on victimization of one type of RJ, while simultaneously explaining what is different and important about the new method we have employed for conducting a literature review in crime prevention research.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heather Strang
  • Lawrence W. Sherman

There are no affiliations available

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