Phylum XV. Spirochaetes Garrity and Holt 2001

Abstract

Spirochetes are Gram-stain-negative, helical or spiral-shaped, motile cells that can flex, rotate and translate through liquid and semisolid environments. Most spirochetes possess a cellular ultrastructure unique to bacteria in that they have internal organelles of motility, namely periplasmic flagella. Consequently, the spirochetes are one of the few bacterial phyla whose phenotypic characteristics, e.g., cell morphology, reflect its phylogenetic relationships as based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons (Garrity and Holt, 2001), forming a distinct line of evolutionary descent among the bacteria (Garrity et al., 2005).

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© Bergey’s Manual Trust 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Forsyth InstituteCambridgeUSA

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