Archaeology for Education Needs: An Archaeologist and an Educator Discuss Archaeology in the Baltimore Country Public Schools

  • Patrice L. Jeppson
  • George Brauer

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrice L. Jeppson
    • 1
  • George Brauer
    • 2
  1. 1.Historical Archaeologist and Independent ScholarPAUSA
  2. 2.Oregon Ridge Nature CenterBaltimore County Center for ArchaeologyCockeysvilleUSA

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