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Chaperones as Parts of Cellular Networks

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Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB,volume 594)

Abstract

The most important interactions between cellular molecules have a high affinity, are unique and specific, and require a network approach for a detailed description. Molecular chaperones usually have many first and second neighbors in protein-protein interaction networks and they play a prominent role in signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks of the cell. Chaperones may uncouple protein, signaling, membranous, organellar and transcriptional networks during stress, which gives an additional protection for the cell at the network-level. Recent advances uncovered that chaperones act as genetic buffers stabilizing the phenotype of various cells and organisms. This chaperone effect on the emergent properties of cellular networks may be generalized to proteins having a specific, central position and low affinity, weak links in protein networks. Cellular networks are preferentially remodeled in various diseases and aging, which may help us to design novel therapeutic and anti-aging strategies.

Keywords

  • Metabolic Network
  • Cellular Network
  • Molecular Chaperone
  • Weak Link
  • Emergent Property

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Peter Csermely .

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Csermely, P., Söti, C., Blatch, G.L. (2007). Chaperones as Parts of Cellular Networks. In: Csermely, P., Vígh, L. (eds) Molecular Aspects of the Stress Response: Chaperones, Membranes and Networks. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol 594. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-39975-1_6

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