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Biceps Tenotomy: Alternative When Treating the Irreparable Cuff Tear

  • E. Peter Sabonghy
  • T. Bradley Edwards
  • Gilles Walch

Abstract

Massive rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. A tear can be determined to be irreparable based on the quality of tendon tissue, quality of the rotator cuff musculature (high-grade fatty infiltration is a poor prognostic indicator for attempted repair), static or advanced humeral head superior migration or subluxation, and the presence of a noncompliant or poorly motivated patient. Pathology of the rotator cuff represents the most common cause of biceps tendon disease and can be classified by the type of underlying lesion.1,2

Keywords

Rotator Cuff Rotator Cuff Tear Biceps Tendon Rotator Interval Bicipital Groove 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Peter Sabonghy
    • 1
  • T. Bradley Edwards
    • 1
  • Gilles Walch
    • 2
  1. 1.Texas Orthopedic HospitalThe University of Texas at HoustonHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Centre Orthopédique SantyLyonFrance

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