Advertisement

Neurosurgery and Acquired Brain Injury

An Educational Primer
  • MIHAI D. DIMANCESCU

Abstract

Injuries of the nervous system are particularly frightening to clients and families because of the many unknowns that still revolve around nervous system function, and because of the potential for resulting life-long disabilities or functional deficits. Recovery from brain injury is best achieved with the full participation of the patient and/or his or her family. To this end, each patient and involved family member needs to have an understanding of basic brain anatomy, physiology and pathology, as well as recuperative abilities, expressed as clearly as possible in understandable language. Because the organization of the brain is extremely complex and since an understanding of the brain and types of possible injuries is not part of our elementary, high-school, or even college education, teaching the patient and family is an ongoing process throughout treatment and rehabilitation. It behooves the neurosurgeon to provide as much of that education as possible during the acute care period of time, and to prepare the patient and family for the rehabilitation process during which the therapists will continue to provide education. The latter phase should also include preparation for re-integration into the community or for long-term care.

Keywords

Brain Injury Intracranial Pressure Subdural Hematoma Epidural Hematoma Severe Brain Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Andrews, K. (1996) International working party on the management of the vegetative state: Summary report. Brain Injury 10:797–806.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Andrews, K. (2005) Rehabilitation practice following profound brain damage. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 15(3–4):461–472.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brodal, A. (1969) Neurological Anatomy, 2nd ed. London: Oxford University Press, pp. 661–680.Google Scholar
  4. DeYoung, S., Grass, R.B. (1984) Coma recovery program. Rehabilitation Nursing 12(3):121–124.Google Scholar
  5. Dimancescu, M.D. (1978, Nov.) Human neurological development: Past, present and future. US Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service N79-15887–15897.Google Scholar
  6. Dimancescu, M.D. (1979, June) Outcome of severe head injuries: 194 cases. Medical Society of the State of New York (Presentation).Google Scholar
  7. Dimancescu, M.D. (1984, Jan.). Controversies in rehabilitation. University of Miami (Presentation).Google Scholar
  8. Dimancescu, M.D. (1986) What is coma? CRA Quarterly Report.Google Scholar
  9. Dimancescu, M.D. (1988) Stress factors and their effects. CRA Quarterly Report.Google Scholar
  10. Dimancescu, M.D. (1994) The spine and the long bones in prolonged coma. CRA Quarterly Report.Google Scholar
  11. Dimancescu, M.D. (1995) Intracranial hemorrhages. South Nassau Communities Hospital (Lecture).Google Scholar
  12. Dimancescu, M.D. (1996) Oxygen radicals in brain injury: Innovative treatment techniques for traumatic brain injury survivors. CRA Symposium, NY: Uniondale.Google Scholar
  13. Dimancescu, M.D. (1999) Seizures, significance and treatment. CRA Quarterly Report.Google Scholar
  14. Dimancescu, M.D. (2000) What you want to know about traumatic brain injury? CRA Quarterly Report.Google Scholar
  15. Guyton, C, Hall, J.E. (2006) Textbook of Medical Physiology, 11th ed. New York: Elsevier, pp. 555–747.Google Scholar
  16. Rouviere, H., Cordier, G., Delmas, A. (1962) In Masson et al. (eds.): Human Anatomy, 9th ed. Paris: Librairies de l'Academie de Medecine, pp. 31–35, see also pp. 469–475, 517–518, 673–683.Google Scholar
  17. Rowland, L.P. (ed.) (2005a) Merritt's Neurology, 11th ed. New York: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, pp. 67–126.Google Scholar
  18. Rowland, L.P. (ed.) (2005b) Merritt's Neurology, 11th ed. New York: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, pp. 483–501.Google Scholar
  19. Rowland, L.P. (ed.) (2005c). Merritt's Neurology, 11th ed. New York: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, p. 1195.Google Scholar
  20. Standing, S. (ed. in chief) (2005) Gray's Anatomy, 39th ed. New York: Elsevier, pp. 43–50, see also pp. 227–235, 275–285, 387–410, 419–430.Google Scholar
  21. Truex, R.C., Carpenter, M.B. (1971) Human Neuroanatomy, 6th ed. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins Company, pp. 12–20, see also pp. 44–57, 148.Google Scholar
  22. Victor, M., Roper, A. (2001) Principles of Neurology, 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, pp. 925–951.Google Scholar
  23. Victor, M., Roper, A. (2001) Principles of Neurology, 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, pp. 933–942.Google Scholar
  24. Victor, M., Roper, A. (2001) Principles of Neurology, 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, pp. 947–950.Google Scholar
  25. Watson, C. (1995) Basic Human Neuroanatomy, 5th ed. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, pp. 44–69.Google Scholar
  26. Wilkins, R., Rengachay, S.S. (1996) Neurosurgery, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw Hill, pp. 2611–2666.Google Scholar
  27. Wilkins, R., Rengachay, S.S. (1996) Neurosurgery, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw Hill, pp. 275–294.Google Scholar
  28. Wilkins, R., Rengachay, S.S. (1996) Neurosurgery, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw Hill, pp. 2717–2846.Google Scholar
  29. Wilkins, R., Rengachay, S.S. (1996) Neurosurgery, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw Hill, pp. 305–514, see also pp. 2699–2708.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • MIHAI D. DIMANCESCU

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations