Skip to main content

Part of the book series: Natural Resource Management and Policy ((NRMP,volume 30))

Abstract

Agricultural biotechnologies, and especially transgenic crops, have the potential to offer higher incomes to biotech firms and farmers, and lower-priced and better quality food for consumers. However, the welfare effects of adoption of genetically modified (GM) food and feed crop varieties are being affected not only by some countries’ strict regulations governing GM food production and consumption, but also by their choice of food trade policy instruments. Specifically, notwithstanding the ending of the European Union’s GM moratorium in April 2004, the continuing use by the EU of strict labeling and liability laws and of variable trade taxes-cum-subsidies and tariff rate quotas is reducing the aggregate gains from new biotechnologies and the incentive for EU taxpayers and for life science companies to support GM food research. The use of variable levies and prohibitive out-of-quota MFN tariffs in particular is yet another reason to push for an ambitious outcome from the WTO’s Doha Round of agricultural trade negotiations.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or eBook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 169.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 299.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 219.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • Alston, J.M., G.W. Edwards, and J.W. Freebairn. 1988. “Market Distortions and Benefits from Research.” American Journal of Agricultural Economics 70(2): 281–288.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Alston, J.M., M.C. Marra, P.G. Pardey, and T.J. Wyatt. 2000. “A Meta Analysis of Rates of Return to Agricultural R&D: Ex Pede Herculum?” IFPRI Research Report No. 113, International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C.

    Google Scholar 

  • Alston, J.M., and P.G. Pardey. 1996. Making Science Pay: The Economics of Agricultural R&D Policy. Washington, D.C: AEI Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Anderson, K., and L.A. Jackson. 2005a. “Standards, Trade and Protection: The Case of GMOs.” Paper prepared for the 41st Panel Meeting of Economic Policy in Luxembourg, April 15–16.

    Google Scholar 

  • ____. 2005b. “Some Implications of GM Food Technology Policies for Sub-Saharan Africa.” Journal of African Economies 14(3): 385–410.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • ____. 2005c. “What’s Behind GMO Disputes?” World Trade Review 4(2): 203–228.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Anderson, K., and W. Martin. 2005. “Agricultural Trade Reform and the Doha Development Agenda.” The World Economy 28(9): 1301–1327.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Anderson, K., and C.P. Nielsen. 2004. “Economic Effects of Agricultural Biotechnology Research in the Presence of Price-Distorting Policies.” Journal of Economic Integration 19(2): 374–394.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bhagwati, J.N. 1958. “Immizerizing Growth: A Geometric Note.” Review of Economic Studies 25(2): 201–205.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carter, C.A., and G.P. Gruère. 2006. “International Approval and Labeling Regulations of Genetically Modified Food in Major Trading Countries.” In R.E. Just, J.M. Alston, and D. Zilberman, eds., Regulating Agricultural Biotechnology: Economics and Policy. New York: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Foster, W., and A. Valdes. 2005. “Variable Tariffs as Special Safeguards: The Merits of a Price Floor Mechanism Under Doha for Developing Countries.” Paper presented at the Workshop on Managing Food Price Risks and Instability, World Bank, Washington D.C, February 28–March 1.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hertel, T.W. (ed.). 1997. Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and Applications. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Huang, J., R. Hu, H. van Meijl, and F. van Tongeren. 2004. “Biotechnology Boosts to Crop Productivity in China: Trade and Welfare Implications.” Journal of Development Economics 75(1): 27–54.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • James, C. 2004. Global Review of Commercialized Transgenic Crops: 2003. International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications, Ithaca, NY.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jean, S., D. Laborde, and W. Martin. 2006. “Consequences of Alternative Formulas for Agricultural Tariff Cuts.” In K. Anderson and W. Martin, eds., Agricultural Trade Reform and the Doha Development Agenda. London: Palgrave Macmillan. Co-published with the World Bank, Washington, D.C.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lindner, R.J., and F.G. Jarrett. 1978. “Supply Shifts and the Size of Research Benefits.” American Journal of Agricultural Economics 60(1): 48–58.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Marra, M., P. Pardey, and J. Alston. 2002. “The Payoffs to Agricultural Biotechnology: An Assessment of the Evidence.” AgBioForum 5(2): 43–50 (available online at http://www.agbioforum.org/v5n2/v5n2a02-marra.pdf).

    Google Scholar 

  • Martin, W., and Z. Wang. 2004. “The Landscape of World Agricultural Protection.” Mimeo, World Bank, Washington, D.C.

    Google Scholar 

  • Moschini, G., and H. Lapan. 2005. “Labeling Regulations and Segregation of First-and Second-Generation GM Products: Innovation Incentives and Welfare Effects.” In R.E. Just, J.M. Alston, and D. Zilberman, eds., Regulating Agricultural Biotechnology: Economics and Policy. New York: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Qaim, M., and D. Zilberman. 2003. “Yield Effects of Genetically Modified Crops in Developing Countries.” Science 299: 900–902.

    Article  PubMed  CAS  ADS  Google Scholar 

  • van Meijl, H., and F. van Tongeren. 2004. “International Diffusion of Gains from Biotechnology and the European Union’s Common Agricultural Policy.” Agricultural Economics 31(2): 307–316.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Anderson, K. (2006). Interactions Between Trade Policies and GM Food Regulations. In: Just, R.E., Alston, J.M., Zilberman, D. (eds) Regulating Agricultural Biotechnology: Economics and Policy. Natural Resource Management and Policy, vol 30. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-36953-2_7

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics