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Multicausal Perspectives on Psychological Injury I: PTSD and MTBI

  • Gerald Young

Abstract

In this chapter and the next, I review recent literature in the three predominant areas of psychological injury presented in the book—Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), chronic pain, and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI). To my knowledge, this review represents the first time that the three areas are reviewed in depth in one article, chapter, or source. The review builds toward a biopsychosocial model across the three areas, with stress considered as a factor common to all three of them (this model is presented in Chapter 7, following the literature review of the three areas). The literature review includes summaries of the main points of the chapters written in the companion volume by Young, Kane, and Nicholson (2006), and adds work published since they were written, in order to give a state of the art perspective of the three areas. I concentrate on articles and chapters published in 2003 to 2005, citing almost two hundred of these, while acknowledging that there are numerous articles and chapters published monthly on these topics. Moreover, I review controversies and confounds associated with the three areas, such as litigation distress, symptom exaggeration, and malingering.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Psychological Injury Clinical Neuropsychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Glendon CollegeYork UniversityToronto

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