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Dictionary of Terms Related to Causality, Causation, Law, and Psychology

  • Gerald Young
  • Ronnie Shore

Abstract

The dictionary of terms presented in this chapter concerns the specific terms of “causality” and “causation,” key terms related to these terms, and auxiliary terms such as “expert witness” and “trier of fact.” For straightforward terms, often, we give only one definition is given and it is derived from a standard source, such as a law dictionary or a psychology dictionary. However, for variation, the definition may be taken from a different source. For important terms, where dictionaries clearly differ in definition, or are complementary, we may provide several definitions, a procedure which facilitates grasping the differences. In addition, this approach also helps prepare discussion of clear differences in definition for the same term across domains, for example, in psychology and in law.

Keywords

Behavior Disorder American Psychological Association Causal Variable Biopsychosocial Model Expert Testimony 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Young
    • 1
  • Ronnie Shore
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Glendon CollegeYork UniversityToronto
  2. 2.Ottawa

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