Development of Information Technology in Hong Kong education over the past decade

  • Alex Fung
Part of the IFIP — The International Federation for Information Processing book series (IFIPAICT)

Abstract

In the early 1980s computer Eeucation was introduced in Hong Kong schools as a new subject in the curriculum. Almost all secondary schools now offer computer literacy to junior form students (ages 12 to 14) and computer studies to senior form students (ages 15 to 16). Computers have not been used across the curriculum nor in the area of CAL/CAI (computer-assisted learning/instruction). Hong Kong has advanced from a developmental to a popularization phase in the use of Information Technology to assist schools in administration and management. In the development phase of over a decade individual schools produced their own Computer-Assisted School Administration (CASA) software in an uncoordinated manner. Popularization began in 1993 when the Hong Kong government started a centralized approach to implement the School Administration & Management System (SAMS) in about 1300 schools. Schools will soon be provided with access to the Internet by the government. Whether there was conscious planning for capacity building for IT in Hong Kong is a matter of doubt. A major question is whether that path is unavoidable when developing countries are building their capacity for IT in education or if there could be quantum leaps bypassing the starts and fits of earlier implementers.

Keywords

Capacity building computer-aided instruction/learning management regional policy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex Fung
    • 1
  1. 1.Hong Kong Baptist UniversityKowloon TongHong Kong, China

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